Santorum on Women in Combat and Radical Feminism: And Now He Is the Front-Runner

Say what you want about Rick Santorum, but right now as of the morning, the former Pennsylvania senator has taken the front-runner baton in the GOP presidential race. (Has anyone even seen Newt Gingrich these days?)

The latest polls out of Michigan show Santorum is in a statistical dead heat with Mitt Romney. Michigan is basically Romney's home state. 

In addition, Real Clear Politics posted the latest polls and Santorum right now is leading in both Michigan and Ohio, key swing states.

In the meantime, Santorum continues to offer some strange thoughts. First off, women in combat.

If you're out there, for example, in a group, or just two people, and some people, because of women, have, as you know with respect to physical capabilities, they don't have the same requirements that men do in the military, and may be in a position if someone is injured, has to be brought back.

The other example is the emotions of men, dealing with women in combat, and having men not focusing potentially on the mission but on the natural instinct to protect someone that's a female.

Next up, an appearance on Meet the Press.

David Gregory:  Let me ask you one more question about women. If you are President of the United States, and women want to work in your administration. Do single women without children only need apply? Are you going to respect the decision of women to come work for you if that’s the choice they make, or would they be somehow held by radical feminists?

Santorum: Well, I think if you go back and look at the people who have worked for me you’d find single women, we have married women, you’ve got all sorts of folks. You know, those are decisions I affirm. If women want to come into the workforce, great.  If they don’t, that’s great.  You know, we’re going to look at the best-qualified people and there will be plenty of working moms who will be in our administration and be adding greatly to the conservative cause I believe in.

Finally, Santorum appears on ABC with George Stephanopoulos, when talking about the feminist dilemma and a book Santorum and his wife wrote called "It Takes a Family" (as a response to Hilary Clinton's "It Takes a Village.")

Santorum: Well, that section of the book was co-written, if you want to be honest about it, by my wife, who is a nurse and a lawyer. And when she gave up that practice and she gave up, you know, nursing to raise a family, I mean, she felt very much that society was sort of — in many cases, looked down their nose at that decision.  And all I’ve said is — and in talking with my wife and others like her — who’ve given up their careers that they should be affirmed in their decision like everybody else and that these are choices, and they’re tough choices.

I think it’s important that women both outside the home and inside the home are affirmed for their choices they make, that they are, in fact, choices, and society, you know, treats them in a sense equally for whatever decision they make that’s best for them.”

Stephanopoulos: You say that now, but you also wrote in the book that radical feminists have been making the pitch that justice demands that men and women be given an equal opportunity to make it to the top in the workplace.  Isn’t that something that everyone should value?”

Santorum: Yeah, I have no problem — I don’t know — that’s a new quote for me. I don’t know what context that was given.  But the bottom line is that people should have equal opportunity to rise in the workforce.  And, again, if you read the entire section, I don’t think anyone will have a problem with the fact that what I was calling for — very clearly calling for is the treatment of an affirmation of whatever decision women decide to make.

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