Is Uncredited Voice Behind “Con Los Terroristas” Sample in “Harlem Shake” Song Suing DJ Baauer?

Of course, you knew that “The Harlem Shake” Internet phenomenon would eventually lead to controversy. After ABC News reported this week that Héctor Delgado, a former Puerto Rican reggaeton star known as Héctor “El Father,” was the uncredited voice behind the opening “con los terroristas” sample of the Baauer song that has become an online legend, it looks like Héctor is going to be lawyering up.

phpThumb_generated_thumbnailjpg

According to reports from Puerto Rico, Delgado told WAPA-Tv’s “Lo sé todo” that he was working with his lawyers and that he plans to meet with them next week to discuss next steps. Delgado, who gave up the reggaeton scene in 2008 and is now a preacher, also confirmed that he recorded “Los terroristas” eight years ago, the song where he used the line that is now heard in thousands of user-generated videos:

Los Terroristas (Remix) – LMP by Hector El Father on Grooveshark

Baauer (Harry Rodrigues), a 23-year-old DJ born in West Philadelphia, recently told The Daily Beast how he formed the viral hit: “I just had the idea of taking a Dutch house squeaky-high synth and putting it over a hip-hop track. And then I tried to just make it the most stand-out, flashy track that would get anyone’s attention, so put as many sounds and weird shit in there as I could. The dude in the beginning I got somewhere off the Internet, I don’t even know where, and the lion roar just makes no sense. There’s the sound of flames in there, too, it’s just really low.”

According the reports, the song has already become an “easy moneymaker” for Bauuer on YouTube. It is also a #1 song on iTunes. And now the “dude in the beginning” from “somewhere off the Internet” or his lawyers will likely be contacting Baauer.

4 comments
Rajkishor rout
Rajkishor rout

The late-week media response to the meme helped the single sell 12,000 units on iTunes in the week ending February 10, according to Nielsen SoundScan. It consequently entered the USDance/Electronic Digital Songs at number nine and the Dance/Electronic Songs at number twelve.[13] Mad Decent's manager Jasper Goggins said that "Harlem Shake" was the "biggest thing" they have released, "and it's happened within six days."[13] In the United Kingdom, "Harlem Shake" reached number twenty-two on the UK Singles Chart during the week of the meme's phenomena. By the end of the chart week, the single had climbed nineteen spots to number three. Martin Talbot, the Official Charts Company's managing director, said that the single's climb on the chart "underlines just how quickly this track has turned into a bone fide phenomenon. At the start of the week, it wasn't even selling enough to make the Top 20—but it is now one of the UK's most popular tracks.

HankTroy
HankTroy

Ya'll need to stfu. Nothing wrong with claiming what truly belongs to you. That's why copyright laws exist, particularly, to protect artists' intellectual rights. This is not the first time this happens and it sure as hell won't be the last. Think back of Vanilla Ice's Ice Ice Baby's beat belonging to the rock band Queen and the legal nightmare that ensued soon after its release. Pretty sure if it were any of you, you'd be seeking monetary compensation as well. Enough said.

meanet yougn
meanet yougn

Proof that God preaches, "Follow the Money"?

 

Trackbacks