WSJ Calls Santorum “Moralizer in Chief” and His Wife Says His Campaign is “God’s Will”

This week the Wall Street Journal posted the following headline about Rick Santorum: Moralizer in Chief? 

What struck us, besides the fact that the WSJ is more right-biased than left-biased, is the following excerpt:

General elections are not won on bases alone. They are won on the margins—with the votes of married, exurban women, of independents, of moderate men. Many of these voters are generally conservative. They are also generally open to, even reassured by, candidates of faith. They are not thrilled by the recent trend in the social-conservative movement toward using government to impose a particular morality—a trend that Mr. Santorum would seem to highlight.

After discussing the political history of social conservatism, the WSJ says this:

It is here that Mr. Santorum has a problem. The Pennsylvanian is a man of deep faith, which many Americans might admire. He is also campaigning on the argument that strong religious communities and families make for a strong America. This, too, is something that ought to resonate with voters, as many believe that these institutions are best suited to solve most problems, and that government needs to get out of their way.

Yet Mr. Santorum has left many Americans with the impression that he believes it his job as president to revitalize these institutions. And he has done little to reassure voters that his personal views will not become policy. Quite the opposite. Mr. Santorum loves, for instance, to highlight his plans to triple the child tax credit—out-and-out social policy clearly rooted in his desire to increase childbirth. Voters will naturally wonder what other values he'd seek to institute via government.

Add to to the fact that Santorum's wife Karen claimed that her husband's campaign is "God's will" and you wonder if the former Pennsylvania sentaror is running for president of another planet.